Iloperidone, Asenapine, and Lurasidone:

A Brief Overview of 3 New Second-Generation Antipsychotics

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Citrome Leslie, MD, MPH

Table of Contents

Postgraduate Medicine:

Volume 123 No. 2

Category:

Clinical Features

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DOI: 10.3810/pgm.2011.03.2273
Abstract: Three new second-generation antipsychotics were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2009 and 2010: iloperidone, asenapine, and lurasidone. All 3 agents are approved for the treatment of acute schizophrenia in adults, and asenapine is also approved for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia and as a monotherapy or as an adjunct to lithium or valproate for the treatment of bipolar manic or mixed episodes. The expectation is that these new agents will be less problematic regarding treatment-emergent weight gain and metabolic disturbances, which unfortunately can occur with several other second-generation antipsychotics. Asenapine is a sublingual preparation, in contrast to iloperidone and lurasidone, which are swallowed. Iloperidone and asenapine are dosed twice daily, in contrast to lurasidone, which is dosed once daily with food. Both asenapine and lurasidone can be initiated at a dose that is possibly therapeutic, but iloperidone requires 4 days of titration to reach its recommended target dose range. Although both asenapine and lurasidone can be associated with dose-related treatment-emergent akathisia, iloperidone is essentially free of extrapyramidal adverse effects or akathisia throughout its recommended dose range. Sedation and/or somnolence have been reported with each medication. They are the most common adverse events associated with asenapine treatment, and are clearly dose-related for lurasidone. In contrast, no therapeutic dose response for iloperidone, asenapine, or lurasidone is clearly evident from short-term clinical trials. Longer-term and naturalistic studies will be helpful in evaluating these agents and their role in the psychiatric armamentarium.

Keywords: antipsychotic , asenapine , bipolar disorder , clinical trials , iloperidone , lurasidone , schizophrenia